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Published on September 29th, 2015 | by Personal Rights

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Suspended Driver’s License What it Means for You

Arrest procedures

As driving a car is considered a privilege, a driver?s license can only be held by those who have been deemed safe drivers. However, if a driver proves that they do not understand the rules of the road, a county court may charge that driver with a suspension of driving privilege. A driver whose license is suspended must avoid being behind the wheel during the duration of their sentence, which can vary from a brief, 90-day period, to several years. In addition, a driver caught behind the wheel with a suspended license can get charged with a variety of other, harsher punishments.

Actions that Lead to Suspension

There are a variety of different reasons that a driver be charged with a suspended driver license. Typically, misdemeanor traffic offenses such as a DUI, speeding, reckless driving, or a hit-and-run accident can leave drivers without the use of their license. However, these are not the only actions that can result in suspension. A driver may also be stripped of their privilege to drive after refusing to take a sobriety test, failing to pay fines, ignoring traffic summons, or failing to file an accident report with the police.

Consequences for Driving with a Suspended Drivers License

Along with any fines the driver had to pay for the original offense, a driver who is caught driving with a suspended drivers license can receive additional consequences. This can include substantial fines, mandatory enrollment of driving courses, permanent license revocation, and even possible jail time. In addition, a driver with a suspended license can also see a rise on car insurance premiums, especially if you have multiple charges against you.

What to Do?

The only thing you can really do when your license has been suspended is to wait until the period of suspension is up. However, there are some cases where you can be granted a temporary, special license that allows you to go back and forth between places such as work or school. These must be applied for and are granted by the DMV or local county court.


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